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The N Word revisited

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So, one of my very first posts discussed my stance on the use of the N word in popular culture. Recently, that post was picked up and re-published on TheFreshXpress.com. Yesterday, a follow-up post was written in direct response to my article. The author of the response attempted to defend the constant use of the word by African-American. Her stance is one that I’ve heard time and time again.

I have nothing more to really say about this. I feel that my stance on the subject matter was strong. As long as we continue to promote and revel in a word that is at it’s origin hateful(and I’m talking about in recent history, pertaining to African-American history, particularly in the United States) we will forever be a lost people. On the whole I mean, not the few individuals that are interested in real analysis of our makeshift culture and checkered past. The problem is, we’re complacent. We’re not interested in really doing the heavy lifting that it takes to really advance and create a positive and uplifting culture. “We” are complacent with our position in this world. A position that includes openly calling ourselves niggers. It’s sad. Honestly.

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4 responses »

  1. You are so right!! Us using that word totally reflects our complancy and that how our fight has evaporated over the years. But do you feel its totally our fault or there are forces out there making sure we stay and remain complacent.

    Reply
    • Hey, Thanks for stopping by. I don’t think any one person is totally at fault. However, I do feel that there is a such thing as taking responsibility for oneself. Here is an example a friend and I were taking about: In general, it’s true that anti-drug laws in the united states were made to target minorities and people from low-income backgrounds. A lot of times that ends of being people of color, more specifically, brown people. Now, even if that is true, if I don’t deal drugs or smoke crack, the chances of me getting popped from drug dealing or turning into a crackhead, are slim. While racism definitely still exists, it’s not 1943 anymore. We have more opportunities than ever to do better and achieve things that our ancestors and older family members couldn’t even dream. I feel like a lot of times we choose not to. We’re doing a find enough job of keeping ourselves down in my opinion.

      Reply
  2. It seems like that – I’m a first generation Black Brit; born in London of West Indian parentage, with the drive and ambition of my parents, I made it to Uni. Yes, drugs and alcohol has not been a part of my life and I pray that it never does. I’m married with kids, and we push the same sort of drive to them and let them know they have to work hard etc. I no longer live in the area where I grew up but I go back regularly to visit friends and family and I’m shocked at people whom I grew up with have either had a mental breakdown, on drugs, prostituting etc. Those who have experienced any of these things are in an ordinary job but what is key they have not been able to leave the area. And there are a very few who have left, ie, gone to the States and their existence there was even more soul destroying then when they left. The question is – is it racism, oppression, poverty, the elite making sure everyone stays in their place? Is it also, as you say, apathy on our part, laziness, making the wrong choices or just simply giving up? I think the answer is complex.

    Reply

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